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From this point forward postings will be made on the main page, but the photos will also be added to the gallery. To see the written information about the photo do a search for the number (the first number, if it is a set).

1029
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – December 21, 2011
This is the last series of photos I took on this date at Theler Wetlands. Nikon D7000, Tamron 70-300 VC zoom at 300mm, ISO 800, f/5.6, 1/320 sec

1027
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – December 21, 2011
Here is a series of various Song Sparrow photos I took at Theler on this date. Don’t forget to click on the photo to get a much larger view. Nikon D7000, Tamron 70-300 VC zoom at 300mm, ISO 800, f/5.6, 1/400 sec

1023
Santa Cruz, California – November 25, 2011
Here is another photo taken outside our cottage in Santa Cruz. Since the first photo is a frontal view, I’m including a lesser quality photo (due to the bird’s position) so you can see a side-view.
Nikon D7000, Tamron 70-300 VC zoom at 300mm, ISO 400, f/5.6, 1/800 sec

1015
Lighthouse Park – Santa Cruz, California – November 22, 2011
On the boardwalk end of the walking-biking trail that goes along the cliff all the way to Natural Bridges State Park, is the most expansive parking and the entrance to a maze of trails that go through woods and fields. It is a good place to do some bird watching. And, when you get tired of of watching birds, you can walk back across West Cliff Drive and watch the surfers near the lighthouse. There were quite a few birds right behind the restrooms. I found these White-Crowned Sparrows here. Nikon D7000, Tamron 70-300 VC zoom at 300mm, ISO 200, f/5.6, 1/800 sec

961
Elkhorn Slough National Wildlife Refuge – Moss Landing, California – October 14, 2011
I see California Towhees in my yard everyday, but there’s nothing like taking a photo in a more natural setting. This photo was really soft, but with a little help from Photoshop and de-noise software it didn’t come out too bad. Unfortunately, the photo will have to remain on the smaller side to keep what sharpness I was able to pull out of it. No calendar photo here! Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, ISO 200, f/6.3, 1/125 sec, tripod Here is another photo in landscape mode. I know it looks like the same photo, but it ain’t.

908
Santa Cruz, California – March 29, 2011
Here are 3 more photos I took on the same day as photos 905. The bird is on my neighbor’s deck and plants.
Nikon D80, Nikon 70-300 mm at 170mm, f/5.0, 1/640, ISO 200, handheld.

905
Santa Cruz, California – near Corcoran Lagoon – March 29, 2011
My neighbors have a little bird feeder that attracts Mourning Doves and House Finches. Last year there was a family of Mourning Doves living under their house. Since I’m only down in Santa Cruz for a few days (that will change soon, yeh!), I don’t get a chance to fully observe their feeder and what species are attracted to it. Next fall I’ll put out my own feeders. Anyway, this trip there was a new visitor – the California Towhee. Since this species likes to feed on the ground, I imagine he is foraging for food that has fallen from the feeder. I’m not familiar with this species. I don’t know if there is a way to distinguish between male and female. Somehow, I think not. Nikon D80, Nikon 70-300 VR at 300 mm, f/5.6, 1/160, ISO 200, handheld

886
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – December 29, 2010
This is by far NOT my best photo of this species. Several of these little guys were digging in the leaves for yummies. What attracted me was how well the bird blended in with its surroundings. The photo was taken on the two barns boardwalk trail not too far from the barns. You should have seen these birds scratch with a vigor that was almost comical. However, this time of the year I’m sure their lives depend on what they find among those leaves. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 200mm, f/5.0, 1/50, ISO 200

839
Theyer Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – October 19, 2009
This lone female was hanging out by herself. Maybe the male got blasted. There are duck hunter blinds at the fringes of the wetlands.

838
Theyer Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – October 19, 2009
It was a rather slow day for birding, but this friendly little sparrow provided an opportunity.

817
UCSC Arboretum – Santa Cruz, California – March 31, 2009
This Golden-crowned Sparrow is banded and looks a bit scruffy. I don’t know why. Maybe it was molting or a young bird.

816
UCSC Aboretum – Santa Cruz, California – March 31, 2009
Occasionally, while visiting California, I get to see a California Towhee. I wish I could have gotten a frontal shot, but at least this shows the characteristic rust colored rump.

814
Carmel, Maine – December 26, 2008
All good things must come to an end – this is my last 2008 photo. On to 2009, which was a lean photo year for me. Life got in the way. I’m hoping 2010 will be a better birding year, and I’m working hard to get my photo processing up-to-date.

791
Bangor City Forest – Bangor, Maine – July 19, 2008
The first two photos show a male of this species and the last two of a female. The photos I’ve seen of this bird, taken by other photographers, shows the male of this species to be entirely blue. I’ve read that there are variations, but possibly this male is young and does not have full male colors yet.

788
Bangor City Forest – Bangor, Maine – July 18, 2008
I had a lot of lifer sightings in Maine this summer. This is another one.

785
Bangor City Forest – Bangor, Maine – July 2008
Here are some more photos of the Swamp Sparrow.

784
Bangor City Forest, Bangor, Maine – July 2008
Shawn took me to Bangor City Forest – a great birding area right in the middle of town. Let me tell you, it was much nicer walking the forest in July than in December! I remember one winter walking the forest for hours and not seeing one moving thing. Not fun when temps were well below freezing. There were a lot of birds to see in July, and Shawn says the birding is even better in Spring. These two photos were taken in low light, and I had to crop the photos quite a bit. Therefore, noise (a grainy look) becomes an issue. In my next posting I’ll show you this species in a different situation – sitting on a cattail. According to my research, the Swamp Sparrow is mostly seen from central USA to the East Coast. I have difficulty IDing the Sparrows that I very seldom see. For that matter, I have difficulty IDing Sparrow of any type – with the exception of my all time favorite Song Sparrow. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, ISO 250, 1/120 sec, f/6.3, tripod

783
Carmel, Maine – July 2008
You can see this species throughout the United States, but rarely in my neighborhood – Puget Sound.

746
Kent Ponds, Washington – June 22, 2008
This Savannah was found in a bush during our walk of this popular bird site.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom, Manfrotto tripod

743
Vaughn Bay, Washington – June 15, 2008
Here are a couple of photos of my most prolific backyard feeder year-round.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom, Manfrotto tripod

740
Vaughn Bay, Washington – June 15, 2008
I’m not the best at IDing immature birds, but I’m pretty sure this is a juvenile Spotted Towhee. I think I can begin to see the orange coloring beginning to come out. The biggest indicator that lead to my conclusion was size and behavior.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom, Manfrotto tripod

739
Vaughn Bay, Washington – June 15, 2008
This is one of my favorite backyard birds. You can find a Spotted Towhee in my yard throughout the year. They like to feed on the ground, but if food is sparse they will go up to a feeder. They prefer the globe feeder because they can go inside and feed as if on the ground.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom, Manfrotto tripod

738
Vaughn Bay, Washington – June 15, 2008
This is a backyard shot of this species. They are regulars during much of the year.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom, Manfrotto Tripod

716
Vaughn Bay, Washington – May 14, 2008
This species is a fairly common bird in my backyard. I may not see them every day, like the Dark-eyed Junco, but I still see them quite often. They like to eat food from the ground just like the Juncos. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom

712
Vaughn Bay, Washington – May 14, 2008
This species can be found in our backyard during any day of the year. They especially like it when I throw cracked corn down on the ground. They have to hurry to eat it as I have a flock of Rock Pigeons and some Mourning Doves that compete for the goodies.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom

703
UC Santa Cruz Arboretum, California – April 3, 2008
This little guy doesn’t seem to know how to avoid bird researcher’s nets. It appears he’s been captured at least three times. Seems like overkill to me. Maybe he would prefer not to sport all the additional jewelry.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 400 ISO

702
University of California Santa Cruz – Arboretum – April 3, 2008
The California Towhee is a very drab cousin of the Spotted Towhee. I see the spotted all the time in the back yard in Washington, but it was a treat to see a bird that I don’t see very often. The first time I saw this species was at Elkhorn Slough NWR the year before. This bird was found in the parking lot. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500 mm. I was shooting ISO 400 as it was late in the day, tripod

683
Moss Landing, California – March 31, 2008
A couple of White-crowned Sparrows came over for a visit while we were photographing water birds in the lagoon. I couldn’t resist the opportunity. The second photo was taken with my Nikon D80.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30 x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

620
Carmel, Maine – December 23, 2007
I got two quick photos of this bird today. I include the second one to show you the beautiful coloring on the back of the ATS.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/80 sec, f/6.3, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod – photos taken through the dining room window

618
Carmel, Maine – December 22, 2007
This is my second set of poor photos in a row, but I just had to post these lifer shots of this beautiful bird. We were driving down the road and noticed them. I should have digiscoped them. Anyway, here are two ID photos.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500 mm, 1/640 sec, f/6.3, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod

615
Carmel, Maine – December 22, 2007
Here is a series of American Tree Sparrows. They were frequent visitors to the backyard feeders.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, f/6.3, 1/125 sec, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod – photos taken through the dining room window

599
Carmel, Maine – December 20, 2007
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 360mm, 1/500 sec, f/6.0, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod – taken through the dining room window

590
Carmel, Maine – December 20, 2007
Here is a bird we don’t have on the west coast – at least not in Puget Sound. I’d have to check my fieldguide to see its range and that would mean getting out of my recliner and walking across the room.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 380mm, 1/100 sec, ISO 400, f/6.0, Manfrotto tripod – photo taken through dining room window

585
Vaughn Bay – Vaughn, Washington – December 8, 2007
This little guy is a regular in our backyard. Lighting was poor today.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 420mm, 1/50 sec, ISO 400, f/6.0, Manfrotto tripod

576
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – November 23, 2007
I never pass up an opportunity to photograph this species. As many of you know, the Song Sparrow is my favorite bird (no offense Chiku – my African Gray). I’m talking North American bird here Cheeks. Anyway, I think the White-crowned comes in a close second. They both sing beautiful songs. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 440mm, 1/640 sec, ISO 400, f/6.3, Manfrotto tripod.

571
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – November 23, 2007
I found this little guy along the trail that leads out to McAllister Creek..

560
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – October 21, 2007
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 330mm, 1/80 sec, f6, ISO 400

552
October 12, 2007 – Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington
I’m trying hard to get caught up on my bird photo processing. The unfortunate thing is that my memory ain’t what it used to be and I don’t remember much about many of these photos. This photo, in particular is bringing up a blank. I usually process into a Photoshop file, with an invisible layer that includes photo data. Somehow I missed these next few shots

494
Vaughn Bay, Washington – May 27, 2007
I believe this is a juvenile Dark-eyed Junco. It is always difficult this time of year to ID the young birds that do not yet have their parent’s coloring. When this bird flew it showed the characteristic white on the underside of its tail feathers.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 at 270mm, 1/30 sec, Manfrotto tripod

485
Vaughn Bay, Washington – May 27, 2007
Spotted Towhees are never far away from a backyard visit. You can usually find one or two. They usually feed on the ground, so I leave some seed on a stump and on the ground next to the stump. They also feed under the bird feeders. They are often the first bird heard in the morning.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/50 sec, Manfrotto tripod

480
Vaughn Bay, Washington – May 27, 2007
This is the male of a pair of House Sparrows that took over an Olive-green Swallow nesting site at my neighbors. I’m writing this on June 18 and their 2nd brood of babies are noisily begging for food. I hope this doesn’t mean my yard population of this species will dramatically increase. This species is known for crowding out other birds from a habitat. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

479
Vaughn Bay, Washington – May 27, 2007
This young bird had the characteristic white flash on the underside of its tail, so my best guess is that it is a fledgling Dark-eyed Junco.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

477
Kent Ponds – Kent, Washington – May 25, 2007
This sparrow flew up into the same bush in which I had photographed the Cedar Waxwing. Notice that this little one has a tasty worm either to eat or to feed to a young one. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/320 sec, Manfrotto tripod

458
Marymoor Park, Washington – May 6, 2007
This little Savannah Sparrow popped up to the bushes for a photo opportunity.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/125 sec, Manfrotto tripod

435
Titlow Beach Park – April 29, 2007
You know me. Every chance I get to take a photo of my favorite bird, I take it. Now don’t get me wrong. I don’t photograph every Song Sparrow I see. However, if the bird is in a nice setting, my shutter is clickin. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 160/sec, Manfrotto tripod

434
Titlow Beach Park – Tacoma, Washington – April 29, 2007
One of the big challenges when shooting with a budget zoom lens is having enough light in forested areas or during heavy overcast skies. Basically, shooting under 1/60 sec is a recipe for failure. Occasionally the bird cooperates by remaining perfectly still for just a moment. That’s what happened here. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 200m, 1/40 sec, Manfrotto tripod

432
Washington Coast – April 21, 2007
My wife and I went over to the Washington coast to check out the migrating shorebirds. The weather was not very good and we got a bit wet. However, we found this nature trail at the St. John’s River. It was very windy, but this Savannah Sparrow flew up in a small tree near me for a photo op. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 410mm, 1/160 sec, Manfrotto tripod

420
Vaughn Bay, Washington – April 14, 2007
Photographed in our backyard. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 300mm, 1/125 sec, Manfrotto tripod

410
Elkhorn Slough, California – April 5, 2007
This was a lifer sighting for me. I have to say the Spotted Towhee I see most every day is much more
striking. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/100 sec, Manfrotto tripod

390
Moss Landing, California – April 4, 2007
I went to Moss Landing to shoot water birds, but this cute little sparrow was spread-eagle on a railing. I couldn’t resist taking its photo. I have no idea why it is standing in this position. Maybe he had been doing jumping jacks!
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 320mm, 1/160 sec, Manfrotto tripod

339
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – March 25, 2007
As you know by now, I can never pass up an opportunity to take a photograph of a Song Sparrow.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 200mm, 1/160 sec, Manfrotto tripod

338
Vaughn Bay, Washington – March 25, 2007
This Spotted Towhee was kind enough to pose for me on a stump in the backyard. This particular photo really shows the bird’s colors well, especially the bright red eye. Lighting was just right. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 350mm, 1/125 sec, Manfrotto tripod

334
Vaughn Bay, Washington – March 16, 2007
These two photos are terrible, but not so terrible that you can’t ID the bird. I know Dark-eyed Juncos are common, but take a close look at this one. It has partial albinoism on its head and neck. A bird that has some albinoism is said to be leucistic. So, even though this is a common bird, the coloring of this particular bird is a bit unusual. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 440mm, 1/13 sec, Manfrotto tripod

320
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – March 3, 2007
I can never pass up the opportunity to take a photo of my favorite bird! Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 200mm, 1/250 sec, Manfrotto tripod

319
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – March 3, 2007
This species can be found at Theler all year round. Sometimes I get a decent photo and sometimes I don’t. This one came out pretty good. This sparrow is usually found on the ground where it forages for food. It uses its feet to dig around in the dirt, sand or grass.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 200mm, 1/40 sec, Manfrotto tripod
As you can see the light was bad and I was lucky to get this shot.

314
Vaughn Bay, Washington – March 17, 2007
This species stayed with us all winter. I occasionally go out in the backyard and try my luck with my camera. Lighting was not the best as it was early in the morning before the backyard receives more sun. Maybe I should say IF we get sun!
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/250 sec, Manfrotto tripod

304
Ediz Hook – Port Angeles, Washington – January 27, 2007
After leaving Dungeness Spit because there were just too many people for photography, we headed to Port Angeles to check out another spit called Ediz Hook. We didn’t see much there except for a bunch of House Sparrows and House Finches.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/320 sec, Manfrotto tripod

275
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – January 14, 2007
As you probably know by now, the Song Sparrow is my favorite bird. What it doesn’t have in color, it has in friendliness and singing. This sparrow is all puffed up due to the cold temperature. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 200mm, 1/100 sec, Manfrotto tripod

267
Vaughn Bay, Washington – January 10, 2007
Here is the Fox Sparrow off the feeding stump and on my special sparrow perch. More photos are shown below. One in particular, shows a good view of the chevron chest pattern. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 200mm, 1/13 sec, Manfrotto tripod

266
Vaughn Bay, Washington – January 10, 2007
This Fox Sparrow showed up in my backyard one day and stayed for several weeks. Actually I saw two of them. Fox Sparrows are easy to ID. They have distinct chevron markings on their chest. I took several photos . Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 330 mm, 1/60 sec, Manfrotto tripod

255
Vaughn Bay, Washington – January 10, 2007
Many Dark-eyed Juncos have stayed around all winter. They are very comic-like and fun to watch. This species prefers to eat on the ground, so I make sure I scatter seed around for them. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 400mm, 1/60 sec, Manfrotto tripod

247
Vaughn Bay, Washington – January 11, 2007
This White-crowned Sparrow showed up in my backyard looking for food. He found plenty. Notice the snow on the ground. It was pretty cold, so this little one is a bit puffed up. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

220
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – December 2, 2006
Several Golden-crowned Sparrows were flitting from tree to tree as I walked the trail. This particular bird has a very nice gold crown.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 300mm, Manfrotto tripod

219
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – December 2, 2006
If you’ve been looking at my photos from the beginning, you know that the Song Sparrow is my favorite bird. I just can’t pass up any photo opportunity. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 390mm, Manfrotto tripod

217
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – December 2, 2006
The photos I post on my website are not the best of David Dilworth photos. They are more a documentation of a particular hike or bird count day. This is not the best photo of a Spotted Towhee, but fighting the fog and low light and still being able to get a recognizable photo amazes me. I keep a record of each species I see on an outing, whether I get a photo or not. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, Manfrotto tripod

209
Vaughn Bay, Washington – November 29, 2006
We had an early snowfall here at Vaughn Bay. This Song Sparrow is scratching for food. Birds like this species prefer to eat on the ground. They use their feet to scratch in the dirt (in this case snow) in search for food. Nikon D80, Nikon 55-200 zoom at 200mm, handheld

188
Vaughn Bay, Washington – November 28, 2006
It was a very blustery day today. You can see the wind blowing the feathers on this poor little guy. We had had our first snowfall and there was an inch or so on the ground, so with the wind it made for a chilly morning.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

187
Vaughn Bay, Washington – November 28, 2006
This is one of the many juncos that frequent my backyard. He is sitting in my neighbor’s lilac bush which is more like a small tree. The background is my neighbor’s garage. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

174
Vaughn Bay, Washington – November 25, 2006
Here is another of this species in a different setting. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod
Another photo shows the bird with his feathers puffed up a bit. This allows birds to trap warm air between the feathers and the bird’s body – sort of a built-in wet suit.

173
Vaughn Bay, Washington – November 25, 2006
This is the most plentiful bird at my backyard feeders. They are very active and their antics keep me laughing. They seem to prefer feeding on the ground, but are not strangers to the hanging feeders or suet cake. They are noisy little guys when they scold each other and chase one another around the yard. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

172
Vaughn Bay, Washington – November 25, 2006
series of 3. This little Song Sparrow has a look on his face like – Can’t a bird take a bath in private!. I got this tuna can bathtub idea from a magazine. The birds love them for both drinking and bathing. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

158
Wapato Park – Tacoma, Washington – November 18, 2006
This is the last shot of this scruffy little Song Sparrow. He looks like he could use a little meat on his bones. This has been a rough Fall and I’m writing this in January. I wonder how many birds have died this winter since it has been so severe and no end in sight.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 400mm, Manfrotto tripod

157
Wapato Park – Tacoma, Washington – November 18, 2006
This scruffy little Song Sparrow is in alert mode. My camera with the big lens is probably the reason, though a Bewick’s Wren was also competing for the same territory. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 400mm, Manfrotto tripod

129
Vaughn Bay, Washington – November 5, 2006
This is the first time I’ve seen a House Sparrow out at Vaughn. I’ve seen them in the city. Since this appearance, I have not seen another in the backyard. This particular bird is a female. At first I thought it was a female House Finch variant, but I was set straight by my ornithologist friends.

083
Vaughn Bay, Washington – October 21, 2006 – 6 PM
A little late evening snack for this Dark Eyed Junco. Didn’t your Mom teach you to clean your bill after eating?
He’s looking at me and thinking, “Why’d you let the seed get wet?”

082
Vaughn Bay, Washington – October 21, 2006
The Spotted Towhee, Song Sparrow, and Dark Eyed Junco are regular visitors to my backyard feeding stump. The Spotted Towhee is the more aggresive of the three.

080
Vaughn Bay, Washington – October 14, 2006
I never tire of taking photos of my favorite Song Sparrows. This little one is enjoying a late morning snack at the stump feeding area.

079
Vaughn Bay, Washington-October 14, 2006
A few years ago I had a large fir tree cut down because my neighbor thought it may fall on their garage. I don’t like cutting down old growth trees, but this stump does make a handy bird feeder.

068
Vaughn Bay, Washington – October 8, 2006
Well, we finally got a visitation from this species to our backyard. This bird is sitting on the Song Sparrow’s favorite perch. I would guess this is a young bird, born in the Spring. His golden crown is barely developed.

067
Vaughn Bay, Washington – October 8, 2006
These little Song Sparrows have almost become pets in my backyard. The branch of this bush is a favorite perch where he can sing his little heart out. Here is another view showing the typical breast of a Song Sparrow. Notice the stripes come together in a little spot. This spot varies from bird to bird.

061
Fort Flagler State Park – Marrowstone Island, Washington – October 7, 2006
Several Savannah Sparrows were feeding on the insects that were all over the seaweed on the beach of a sand spit.
If you look carefully, you can see an insect caught in the bird’s beak.

052
Theler Wetlands, Belfair Washington – September 30, 2006
This Golden Crowned Sparrow was enjoying some seed that a hiker had spread along a railing next to the trail. There were several other species that were feeding on the seed as well.

050
Theler Wetlands, Belfair Washington – September 30, 2006
I’m pretty sure this is a White Crowned Sparrow – immature Pacific species. They were eating seed that a previous hiker scattered around.

049
Theler Wetlands, Belfair Washington – September 30, 2006
One of the hikers carried some seed along the trail and left some here and there. It was nice because it attracted some birds for an easier opportunity to photograph. Here is a front-on shot.

045
Theler Wetlands, Belfair Washington – September 30, 2006
This is the first Golden Crowned Sparrow I have seen at Theler. In fact, it may be the first of this species I’ve seen. For sure, it is the first one I’ve photographed.

044
Theler Wetlands, Belfair Washington – September 30, 2006
Sparrows prefer to feed on the ground. Occasionally a hiker will bring bird seed and scatter it along the trail. This bird was taking advantage of the free handout. The sparrows at my backyard feeders will go to the hanging feeders, but they often eat beneath them or at a tree stump where I scatter food for them and others that like to eat on the ground.

043
Theler Wetlands, Belfair Washington – September 30, 2006
The habitat at Theler is perfect for birds like the Song Sparrow. They sit in the reeds or on top of bushes and sing their little hearts out.

042
Theler Wetlands, Belfair Washington – September 30, 2006
Song Sparrows are one of my favorite birds. They don’t have the bright colors and they look a little pudgy, but they have a great personality (birdality?).

038
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – September 23, 2006
This was the first time I had seen a Savannah Sparrow. It flew into a small tree next to the trail I was walking near the end of a full day of birding. It stayed long enough for me to get a few photos.

014
Vaughn Bay, Washington – September 17, 2006
We have a few Song Sparrows that live in the bushes next to our driveway and on my neighbor’s property. They just love to sit on a post or in the bushes and sing for me. During the summer I would take my laptop computer outside and play a typical Song Sparrow song. One little guy was so interested in how I could sing his song that he flew over and tried to land in my lap. He would settle down just a few feet away and repeat his song every time I played the computer clip. Now these little guys often come fairly close and sit and sing to me when I come out of the house. They also start shipping when I come around and I talk to them just like I talk to my African Gray Parrot.
In high school I found a newly hatched sparrow that had fallen out of a nest and raised him to adulthood. He was a smart little fellow and would sit on my shoulder inside the house or out. He would come to me on command. His name was Chirpy. Sparrows are special birds for me.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, tripod

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Vaughn Bay, Washington – September 17, 2006
These little guys frequent our backyard feeders. I cropped the bird to make him fill the whole frame, but decided I liked seeing more of the background. Also, it makes for a sharper image. The Juncos like to chase each other around a lot. They’re fun to watch.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, tripod