Warblers Kinglets Yellowthroats

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From this point forward postings will be made on the main page, but the photos will also be added to the gallery. To see the written information about the photo do a search for the number (the first number, if it is a set).

1028
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – December 21, 2011
All you bird photographers out there know how difficult it is to get a Kinglet to sit still for a second to get a photo. Then, they always make a quick stop behind a branch so you can’t get that perfect shot. This is typical! Nikon D7000, Tamron 70-300 VC zoom at 250mm, ISO 800, f/5.6, 1/160 sec

1016
Lighthouse Park – Santa Cruz, California – November 22, 2011
Nikon D7000, Tamron 70-300 VC zoom at 300mm, ISO 400, f/5.6, 1/800 sec
This bird was photographed in the fields of succulents that frequent the coastline of Central California.

994
26th Ave – Santa Cruz, California – November 19, 2011
On the way home from our daily walk we ran into this treat just a block or so from our cottage. I haven’t had an opportunity to see this species very often, so I was determined to get a photo. It was after 3PM and the sun was low in the sky putting the tree in the shadows. I don’t think I would have gotten a photo with my D80, but I bumped up my D7000 to ISO 1600 and gave it a try. The photos are pretty soft and there is a bit of noise, but as far as a good documentation of the sighting I couldn’t ask for much more – well better lighting of course. Nikon D7000, Tamron 70-300 VC zoom at 240mm, ISO 1600, f/5.6, 1/320 sec.

992
Pleasure Point – Capitola, California – November 19, 2011
My wife and I walked down the steps to the rocks to watch the surfers. This Yellow-rumped Warbler came down to join us, but wouldn’t get very close. I could have used the extra reach of my 200-500 lens, but having the image stabilization and not having to lug a tripod around I think will be better. I’ll just have to learn to be sneakier so I can get closer. Nikon D7000, Tamron 70-300 VC zoom at 300mm, ISO 800, f/5.6, 1/1250 sec

890
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – December 30, 2010
I saw this bird playing around on the ice and wasn’t quite sure what it was. After studying the photo, I believe this to be a Yellow-rumped Warbler – Myrtle. I don’t believe this species is commonly seen in the winter, but the Myrtle is not rare in the west during the winter. In the summer I usually see the Audubon variety. Nikon D80 with Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm and tripod. f6.3, 1/200, ISO 200

796
Carmel, Maine – July 22, 2008
I don’t think these two photos got posted to the original blog for some reason. Probably just an oversight. These were taken right next to my daughter’s house when they lived in Maine and I was visiting.

794
Bangor City Forest – Bangor, Maine – July 19, 2008
I think I’ve photographed this bird twice while in Maine. Unfortunately, neither photo is very good. However, it is good enough to make a positive ID.

793
Bangor City Forest – Bangor, Maine – July 19, 2008
Shawn and I believe this bird is an immature Common Yellowthroat. If you have a different opinion, please feel free to share.

789
Bangor, Maine Bog Boardwalk – July 19, 2008
I’m not positive of this species. It was a lifer and I don’t know where I was. Somewhere in the wilds of Maine.

766
Bird’s Acre, Ellsworth, Maine – July 12, 2009
I know this photo is about as bad as it gets, but this was a lifer siting for me and I include the photo on my blog strictly for record keeping purposes. I won’t even include any photographic details.

757
Bird’s Acre, Ellsworth, Maine – July 11, 2008
This is not a good photo, but I wanted to record the observance of this lifer bird.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom, tripod

729
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – May 31, 2008
This photo is affected by low light, distance and a good amount of cropping.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod, ISO 100, 1/60 sec

721
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – May 16, 2008
Here is a set of three photos. The first is a male – a heavily cropped photo so a little noisy. The second two are of a female. One is cropped quite a bit and the last is one I include simply because I like the setting. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom

696
Elkhorn Slough National Wildlife Refuge, California – April 2, 2008
As we began our hike down the hill from the visitor’s center there are a lot of thicket bushes on the hillside. We heard this yellowthroat, but had a hard time getting a good view of it due to all the branches. This is a female and the best photos I was able to get of this pretty little girl.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom on a tripod

578
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – November 23, 2007
If you know this bird, you know that it doesn’t stay in one place for very long. I got one photo of this bird and this is it.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/250 sec, ISO 400, f/6.3

567
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – November 3, 2007
Whenever a kinglet stays still for a second you better be firing or you’ll loose your opportunity – especially if you are using a digiscoping rig. I only got 2 shots off before he flew off. The second shot wasn’t bad, except the bird had his head turned slightly away. This is one time when the ISO setting at 400 may have allowed me to get a shot whereas at ISO 50 I may have gotten a blur.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod, 1/180 sec, f4.3, ISO 400

475
Kent Ponds – Kent, Washington – May 25, 2007
This is a documentation photo of a lifer bird sighting. The photo is not very good, but it does prove that I observed this bird. This is a male.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/160 sec, Manfrotto tripod

443
Titlow Beach Park – April 29, 2007
Here are a few more shots of this bird. I’ve never seen so many YR Warblers in one spot before.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/320 sec, Manfrotto tripod

440
Titlow Beach Park – Tacoma, Washington – April 29, 2007
There were Yellow-rumped Warblers all over the place near the north pond today. Now, getting them to sit still for a moment was another thing.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/160 sec, Manfrotto tripod

379
Harkin’s Slough – near Watsonville, California – April 4, 2007
On the way to Moss Landing we explored a couple beaches and this slough. It was difficult to take photos as most of the birds were fieldscope away. However, this warbler played with me. I found it alongside the road that leads to where the slough crosses the road and the road ends. It’s not a good photo, but I wanted documentation of my sighting. Lighting and distance were problems.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/80 sec, Manfrotto tripod

277
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – January 14, 2007
This tiny little bird is really difficult to photograph. It is constantly flitting from branch to branch. Occasionally it will allow you to see the ruby- colored mark on the top of its head. This is how the bird got its common name. You can barely see the ruby color in this photo.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 200mm, 1/100 sec, Manfrotto tripod

258
Vaughn Bay, Washington – January 10, 2007
This was the first time I’ve seen this species and the only time I have seen this bird in my back-yard. The photos are not very good, but good enough for IDing this bird. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 at 400mm, 1/60 sec, Manfrotto tripod

180
Manchester State Park – Port Orchard, Washington – November 25, 2006
This Ruby was located in the same place as the Golden-crowned Kinglet. Another flitter that is hard to photograph. This bird has a bright red spot on the top of its head that you can’t see unless the bird raises it. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 300mm, I believe these were handheld.

179
Manchester State Park – Port Orchard, Washington – November 25, 2006
Golden-crowned Kinglets are hard to photograph. Like many little birds they have a tendency to flit around a great deal. This photo is way too busy, but it does show the features of the bird quite well. I took many photos, but this was the only one that came out half-way OK.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 200mm, I think this was handheld

048
Theler Wetlands, Belfair Washington – September 30, 2006
I had little hope of photographing this species’ yellow rump because it only showed when it flew. I think this bird has more yellow during breeding season. I saw several of these birds and none looked any different than this one. Females and males are very similar in coloration, so no help there.

025
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – September 30, 2006
Several of these birds were flitting around the marsh. I took many photos, but these birds were so active that I couldn’t get a decent shot. This is about the best of the day. As far as identification, when this bird would take flight they had a bright yellow patch on the top backside of their rump. They had no other yellow markings. At first I thought they may be Pine Siskins, but according to my fieldguide they have yellow on their tail, not their rump. I may have stayed at this location for up to 30 minutes before getting this one decent photo.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, tripod