Ducks Geese Swans 2007

2007

635
Portland, Maine – December 28, 2007
This is the last series of photos I have of this bird. Actually, I should say birds, as there were several ducks on the shore and in the water this day. I have one shot of a Red Squirrel to post, but this is the last set of birds for 2007. I know – it’s about time!
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, f6.3, 1/500 sec, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod

634
Portland, Maine – December 28, 2007
This bay was right in the middle of the city. There were several Black Ducks there trying to keep warm. This is series 2 of 3.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, f6.3, 1/320 sec, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod

633
Portland, Maine – December 28, 2007
Last Christmas I only got one photo of this bird. I got a lot more this year. This is the first of three series.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, f6.3, 1/400 sec, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod

606
Unknown Location – Washington – December 8, 2007
This is one of two photos digiscoped as an experiment with ISO 400. It’s not the greatest, but I liked the composition. I’m pretty sure it was taken at Theler or Nisqually. There is a chance that it was taken in front of the house at Vaughn. I have learned to keep my P4 at either 50 or 100 ISO. Its top end is 400 and it just doesn’t do well at the top of its range.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

584
Vaughn Bay – Vaughn, Washington – December 8, 2007
This Bufflehead was playing in front of the house.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/1000 sec, ISO 400, f/6.3, Manfrotto tripod

580
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – November 23, 2007
It is difficult to pass up an opportunity to photograph a willing bird, even if it is a Mallard. Though the Mallard is a very common bird, it is beautiful none-the-less. The last three photos in this series are all about background and different hues of color. The bird is in an uncanny identical pose on all three photos.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/500 sec, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod

579
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – November 23, 2007
There was some interesting lighting as I photographed this bird that made the water look golden. The golden water and this bird complement one another. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/200 sec, ISO 400, f/6.3, Manfrotto tripod

 

575
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – November 23, 2007
Winter started early this year. This Northern Shoveler was skating across the ice.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500 mm, 1/400 sec, ISO 400, f/6.3, Manfrotto tripod

572
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – November 23, 2007
Heading south on the dike trail toward the creek I came upon several Ring-necked Ducks that were within digiscoping range. I was lucky to get a lot of good shots, and the hard part was deciding which ones to save. Lighting was pretty good. Even though it was almost noon, the sun waslow in the sky during this time of year, and it happened to be at my back.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod, 1/590 sec, f7.5, ISO 200

559
Wapato Lake – Tacoma, Washington – October 13, 2007
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 420mm, 1/80 sec, f13, ISO 400

558
Wapato Lake – Tacoma, Washington – October 13, 2007
I liked the coloring of this photo so much that I included it in my 2008 AKA Bird Nerd calendar.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/80 sec, f13, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod

557
Wapato Lake – Tacoma, Washington – October 13, 2007
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/125 sec, f13, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod

553
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – October 12, 2007
This was a lifer sighting for me. That much I do remember. I took about 10 keeper shots of this bird, but I’ll only post three. As I recall I digiscoped these at a great distance, so the quality is not great.

550
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – July 23, 2007
Here are a couple shots of a Wood Duck. We saw quite a few of them at the refuge today.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500 mm, 1/50 sec, Manfrotto tripod

537
Moss Landing, California – July 14, 2007
I was very happy to see this duck. It is the same duck with the broken wing that I photographed last spring. He seems to be doing quite well here. By the way, all the photos from Moss Landing taken on July 14 were taken in very foggy conditions. Photoshop helped me minimize the haze some. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

507
Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge – Ridgefield, Washington – June 2, 2007
Here are 5 photos of Cinnamon Teals in three different locations of the auto trail. This first one is located at the beginning of the auto loop, just to the left of the road. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500 mm, 1/100 sec, Manfrotto tripod

506
Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge – Ridgefield, Washington – June 2, 2007
One of these days I’ll get a male ruddy in breeding colors to pose for me like these photos shown here. This bird was just off the auto trail and I was walking in front of the car. I quickly snapped a few shots when the bird came out of the tall grass.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/160 sec, Manfrotto tripod

499
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – May 28, 2007
This young goose was one of many that were grazing in the grass on a little island in the middle of the Union River. The parents were close by.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

498
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – May 28, 2007
Well, get ready to be Mallarded to death. This female would not stray far from her babies that were sitting on the edge of the pond in a little huddle, so I took the opportunity to get several close-up shots. I took 10 photos, but I’ll just post 5 here.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 200mm, 1/320 sec, Manfrotto tripod

497
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – May 28, 2007
You never know what you might find at the edge of a pond. It took me a minute to find out what a female mallard was so upset about, but I soon found these little ones in the high grass next to the pond. It also gave me a good opportunity to take some close-ups of the mother.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 210mm, 1/400 sec, Manfrotto tripod

490
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – May 28, 2007
In the middle of the Union River that leads out into Hood’s Canal there is a grassy area. Two Canada Geese had their gosslings out feeding on the grass. Here is a shot of one adult and one of the babies. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/160 sec, Manfrotto tripod

464
Vaughn Bay, Washington – May 10, 2007
These 3 photos were taken near 8:00 PM with the sun low on the horizon and unfortunately digiscoped in quite low light. They are not great photos, but this species is so beautiful that I just had to include them. They only stayed around for a few days.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

453
Juanita Park – Kirkland, Washington – May 6, 2007
A couple of little ducklings with their mother swam by the boardwalk while we were digiscoping photos of Bald Eagles. I grabbed my DSLR and got a few shots before they swam out of range. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 440mm, 1/160 sec, Manfrotto tripod

448
Marymoor Park – King County, Washington – May 6, 2007
Light was low, but I was able to get a photo of this Wood Duck. Mosquitos were so thick they tried to carry us away. Next time we visit this park we’ll smother ourselves in repellant. There were a lot of tall reeds along the shore so it was hard to shoot through the obstructions.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/80 sec, Manfrotto tripod

447
Titlow Beach Park – April 29, 2007
I took a few photos with my D80 camera of this duck. This photo is digiscoped with the P4. It is not as crisp as I would like, but I’ve not been lucky in getting good photos of this species, so I’ll take what I can get. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

445
Titlow Beach Park – April 29, 2007
Whenever I see a group of wigeons, I always try to search out a Eurasian. No disappointments today. Here are two photo I wanted to include as it shows the duck against the green water of the north pond. The ducks would not come near the shore where I was standing, so I didn’t get any close-in photos. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/80 sec, Manfrotto tripod

444
Titlow Beach Park – Tacoma Washington – April 29, 2007
This is a series of two Bufflehead photos. The ducks didn’t get very close to my position, but the lighting was right. As it is, I had to do a lot of cropping to get what I got. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/125 sec, Manfrotto tripod

442
Titlow Beach Park – April 29, 2007
There were tons of baby Mallard chicks in the north pond today. I thought I’d photograph a couple of shots of Ma and Pa as well.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 270mm, 1/125 sec, Manfrotto tripod

441
Chamber’s Creek – Steilacoom, Washington – April 29, 2007
We saw a couple Canada Goose families today. One family had 4 chicks and the other 2. The family with two came over to shore close to where our car was parked. The family of 4 chicks stayed out in the middle of the water.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/200 sec, Manfrotto tripod

439
Titlow Beach Park – Tacoma, Washington – April 29, 2007
There were little Mallards all over the north pond today. They swam so fast that it was difficult to get a crisp photograph of them. They were independent little guys. They were all over the place and you couldn’t really tell who their mother’s were.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 320mm, 1/100 sec, Manfrotto tripod

438
Titlow Beach Park – April 29, 2007
Here is a series of 4 photos. Two are of mated pairs and two of single males. The sun was low on the horizon – shots taken just after 9AM. The angle of the sun gives the ducks their rainbow colors on the black feathers. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/125 sec, Manfrotto tripod

436
Titlow Beach Park – April 29, 2007
There were several wigeons and mallards in the north pond today. Here is a photo of one. It isn’t easy to get a crisp photo of anything moving at 1/60 sec. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 460mm, 1/60 sec, Manfrotto tripod

428
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – April 15, 2007
There were hundreds of geese at the refuge today. Every now and then a large group would get spooked by something and take to the air. They would fly around a bit making a tremendous amount of noise. Gradually they would settle back down to the ground.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500 mm, 1/400 sec, handheld

426
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – April 15, 2007
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/80 sec, Manfrotto tripod

409
Moss Landing State Park – California – April 5, 2007
Here is a series of 4 photographs. This Greater Scaup has a broken (dead) wing, but seems to be able to get around OK. Nature will probably have her way with this bird before too long. However, I did see the same bird 3 months later in this same location. Even with a bumb wing this is a pretty bird. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

406
Moss Landing State Park, California – April 5, 2007
This was the only Bufflehead I saw in the lagoon just inside the entrance to the park. The photo is a bit soft and not as crisp as I like.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

378
Seacliff Beach State Park – California – (stream at southern end of park) – April 3, 2007
These ducks were found in a stream just south of the beach park – next to the parking lot at Rio del Mar.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 490mm, 1/125 sec, Manfrotto tripod

352
Natural Bridges State Park – Santa Cruz, California – April 2, 2007
This was the first time I had seen this duck. I wanted to get some good photos, but the lighting was too poor. This was the best photo I got.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 390mm, 1/80 sec, Manfrotto tripod

340
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – March 25, 2007
I know that Canada Geese are very common, but I continue to take photos of the common birds I see most every day. Whenever I get a particularly good shot, I post it on my blog. There’s nothing special about this photo except for the fact that I think it does a pretty good job of displaying the beauty of this bird. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 450mm, 1/200 sec, Manfrotto tripod

337
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – March 25, 2007
I was doing a little experimenting with my Nikon P4 – shooting in aperture priority mode. Boy was that a mistake for digiscoping. Everything came out too dark. I was able to save this photo by lightening it up a bit, but I lost most of the day’s photos. I usually shoot in sports mode.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

335
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – March 25, 2007
Lighting was a problem on this outing. Many potential good photos were lost. This one came out OK so I’ll save it.
I don’t usually see Northern Pintails on land, so this was a bit of a treat.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82 mm ED, 30 x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

331
near Port Orchard, Washington – March 4, 2007
First, look at the Goldeneye. It looks like a female but you can see the white spot developing between eye and bill. Therefore, it is a first year male. My field guides never mention ways to tell the difference between male & female grebes, so I guess you can’t.
These two were as cute as can be. I watched them for quite a while. They swam together, dove together, and looked like the odd couple. It was near a small pier and there were no other birds around except for gulls, pigeons and crows.
I sometimes see species together – like Pine Siskins and American Goldfinches. However, that’s a rather common sight. I also see different species of ducks or water birds feeding in the same location, but this sight was really different because the birds stayed close together like they were a mated pair or from the same nest.

328
Port Orchard, Washington – March 4, 2007
Here are some more photos of this very coorperative bird.
Info for the first photo:
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 390mm, 1/125 sec, Manfrotto tripod

327
Port Orchard, Washington – March 4, 2007
Down at one of the marinas this very cooperative young male merganser gave me some good opportunities.
This series shows:
1) Side view of this pretty duck
2) Duck looking for food on the bottom
3) Diving for food
4) Eating
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 300mm, 160/sec, Manfrotto tripod

326
Port Orchard, Washington – March 4, 2007
Here is a favorite photo of mine showing the male and female swimming together.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 390mm, 1/200 sec, Manfrotto tripod

325
Port Orchard, Washington – March 4, 2007
This is the female Barrow’s Goldeneye. The female of this species and that of the Common Goldeneye look very much alike. Fortunately, you usually see male ducks where you see the females, so it is a good bet that a female Barrow’s is not running around with a male Common. Mother Nature can be very sly, so you need to be aware that a young male Barrow’s looks a lot like the female.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 400mm, 1/100 sec, Manfrotto tripod

324
Port Orchard, Washington – March 4, 2007
This is a male. Notice the teardrop white pattern bewteen eye and bill. This can help you distinguish between the Common Goldeneye male. The Barrows also has the pattern of white spots along its side, which the Common doesn’t have.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 400mm, 1/200 sec, Manfrotto tripod

322
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – March 3, 2007
Here is another Canada Goose. Besides this photo I’ve included in this set of three photos, a goose that got a little angry with a goose near it. In the second photo you can see the goose on his initial attack. In the third photo it looks like the goose is walking on water. You can see a splash in front of the goose. That is where the bird was that is the subject of the attack. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/160 sec, Manfrotto tripod

321
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – March 3, 2007
This is a set of 3 photos. The third photo is a large flock of Canada Geese flying over the wetlands. Actually, they landed in a farmer’s field not to far from where I was standing. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/160 sec, Manfrotto tripod Flight shot is handheld.

313
Vaughn Bay, Washington – March 4, 2007
This Common Goldeneye paid us a little visit in front of the house. You know I can’t resist pulling out my camera when this happens.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

312
Vaughn Bay, Washington – March 10, 2007
Photographing this species has been one of my most difficult challenges. The contrast between the dark black and white white is very hard to capture in a photograph. The lighting has to be perfect. I believe this is my best effort to date.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

311
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – February 10, 2007
Being a person with a rather large snazola myself, I can really identify with this duck. My focus is not the best on some of these, but I didn’t have the heart to throw them away. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

310
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – February 10, 2007
This was the first time I had seen this species, so I just had to get a photo. Unfortunately, the flock was way out across the marsh. I used my digiscope and put my zoom at maximum power. I took several shots, but this is the only one that came out at all. The others were not in focus, and as you can see, this one is marginal. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

305
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – February 10, 2007
The first photo is a male. The second photo is a female. The third photo shows this species feeding from the bottom.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

303
Vaughn Bay, Washington – February 4, 2007
This duck took a swim by the house and I grabbed a quick photo.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

301
Olympic Peninsula – Bluff near Dungeness Spit – January 27, 2007
This shot is really stretching the limits of my digiscope. We were high on a bluff looking down at the water. I kept this shot because this is the first Black Scoter I’ve seen on the west coast. I saw them in Maine at Christmas, but I wanted to document this find. We saw 3 types of scoters in this one spot – Surf, White-winged, and the Black. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

299
Port Orchard, Washington – January 15, 2007
This particular duck was very accomodating. I got several very good photos of him. Most are very similar, so I’ll only post 3 here.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 440mm, 1/160 sec, Manfrotto tripod

298
Port Orchard, Washington – January 15, 2007
Here is the last series of Barrow’s Goldeneye. These are all males.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 300mm, 1/200 sec, Manfrotto tripod

297
Port Orchard, Washington – January 15, 2007
This is the male and female together. They look quite different; the male, of course, being the more beautiful of the two. Now if God often made the male of many species better looking than the female, would it go to reason that…. Never mind. My wife just came in the room.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 270mm, 1/250 sec, Manfrotto tripod

296
Port Orchard, Washington – January 15, 2007
The water was so smooth for this photo. I think it was taken between a marina and the shore. This is a male. I have nine photos I’d like to show you. I’ll split them up in sets of three. All photos are of males, with one exception where I have a male and female swimming together.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 440mm, 1/160 sec, Manfrotto tripod

295
Port Orchard, Washington – January 15, 2007
Here is the last set of mergansers for this date. This is a young male of the species. An older male photo is below.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 490mm, 1/200 sec, Manfrotto tripod

294
Port Orchard, Washington – January 15, 2007
Here is a photo of the beautiful male. Don’t these mergansers look like they’ve had a bad hair day?
Also shown is a 1st year male. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 460mm, 1/200 sec, Manfrotto tripod

293
Port Orchard, Washington – January 15, 2007
I believe this is a 1st year male of this species. Also shown is a mature male.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 490mm, 1/200 sec, Manfrotto Tripod

292
Port Orchard, Washington – January 15, 2007
This is a female Barrow’s Goldeneye. I’ve included a total of 3 photos in this set. Take a close look at the last one. I was following the bird as she swam along the shore. Am I mistaken, or is that a look of disgust on her face in the last photo? I think she was put-out that I wouldn’t leave her alone. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 270mm, 1/250sec, Manfrotto tripod

291
Port Orchard, Washington – January 15, 2007
I try to take photos with my DSLR as well as my digiscoping outfit. Here are 4 photos of this duck using the DSLR. I have already posted some digiscoped shots. Notice the head is shaped a bit different from the Greater Scaup.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 490mm, 1/200sec, Manfrotto tripod

288
Port Orchard, Washington – January 15, 2007
Here is the 2nd set of Greater Scaup photos. There are four shots. Which one do you like the best?
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

287
Port Orchard, Washington – January 15, 2007
I have several shots of this duck. Therefore, I’ll divide it into two sets of 4 photos each. Again, I’m having trouble choosing the best photo. So, I’ll leave it up to you to pick your favorite. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

286
Port Orchard, Washington – January 20, 2007
Here is another set of Common Goldeneyes. The lighting was more subdued this day. There is nothing special about these 4 shots other than one bird appears to be a real cone head. I don’t know why his head is shaped that way.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

285
Port Orchard, Washington – January 15, 2007
This is the first set of 4 shots taken on this date. The second set has different lighting, and was taken 5 days later than these. The CG is a diving duck. One of the photos shows the duck preparing to dive. Another shows the eye membrane half open as a duck just surfaced. The membrane allows the bird to see well under water. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

284
Port Orchard, Washington – January 20, 2007
This is a set of 4 female HMs. The next photo is a typical pose for this duck. They, like many other divers, like to swim along with their head in the water so they don’t miss any good stuff on the bottom. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

283
Port Orchard, Washington – January 15, 2007
I spied this EW swimming with a large group of American Wigeons. It was in a hurry to swim by me, so I had to be quick with the camera. I find both the EW and the AW ducks to be rather skiddish. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

281
Port Orchard, Washington – January 20, 2007
I really like the reflection of this bird’s head in this photo. The next photo is a female, followed by 3 more shots of males. There were a lot of scoters just off shore today. Which photo of the five do you like best? Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

280
Port Orchard, Washington – January 15, 2007
This is a male White-winged Scoter. There are quite a few of these water birds in the Port Orchard area. This is a single posting. My next post will be a series of WW Scoters taken in Port Orchard 5 days later. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

279
Port Orchard, Washington – January 20, 2007
Here is a set of RB Merganser photos. They aren’t the best, but they do show the difference between the male and female. The male is the most colorful. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

278
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – January 14, 2007
I previously posted several photos of this duck using my digiscoping outfit. This is the only photo I took with my DSLR.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/160 sec, Manfrotto tripod

273
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – January 14, 2007
This is the last series of photos for this species taken on Jan 14. This is a set of 3 similar shots, so pick your favorite.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 400mm, 1/125 sec, Manfrotto tripod

272
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – January 14, 2007
This is a series of 4 photos. The first 3 are rather similar. Pick your favorite. The last of the set is a shot of the bird diving underwater.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 420mm, 1/320 sec, Manfrotto tripod

271
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – January 14, 2007
Here is the little Bufflehead in a different part of the marsh and a different lighting pattern. Again, this is a solo photo. The next two will have a 3 and 4 shot series of similar shots. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 400mm, 1/125 sec, Manfrotto tripod

270
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – January 14, 2007
A couple of these little guys were playing around in the water underneath the footbridge on the trail. My guess is that this is a female. I don’t know what a juvenile male looks like. I have 4 total sets of this bird and her friend. This is a solo shot.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/250 sec, Manfrotto tripod

265
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – January 14, 2007
Here are some more photos of this duck. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

264
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – January 14, 2007
This single Green-winged Teal was in a marshy area just off a wooden walkway/bridge. He didn’t seem concerned at all that we were fairly close to him. He was very difficult to photograph because he was constantly on the move and had his head under the water most of the time.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

263
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – January 14, 2007
This is a female Red-breasted Merganser. She was in the act of scratching herself and I caught her as she was lowering her leg. This is why her foot looks to be in such a weird spot. I assure you, she did not have a leg growing out the side of her body.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

259
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – January 14, 2007
Several Canada Geese were grazing in the grasses of the wetlands. I usually see this species in the water, flying overhead, or in green grassy areas. I wanted to get a photo of this bird in a different habitat.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

250
Vaughn Bay, Washington – January 12, 2007
Get ready for a marathon photo display of Common Goldeneyes. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

249
Vaughn Bay, Washington – January 12, 2007
Here is another typical side shot of this species. The second shot is of the bird doing a little head dance for his wife or girlfriend. I have observed both the Common and Barrow’s Goldeneyes doing this head bob to attract the females (I’m guessing).
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

248
Vaughn Bay, Washington – January 12, 2007
We don’t get to see Barrow’s Goldeneye very often in front of the house. Usually we have Common Goldeneye.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod
This photo is of the bird with its head turned slightly away. However, the reflection gives you full view of the face. Interesting angle.