Ducks Geese Swans 2008

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Nisqually National Wildlilfe Refuge – October 18, 2008
This is a duck I don’t see that often.

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Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – October 18, 2008
Sometimes it’s more about where the bird is than the bird!

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Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – October 18, 2008
One good thing about digiscoping is the ability to get really close portraits.

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Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington – October 18, 2008
I really liked the setting in this photo. I think it came out pretty well – if I must say so myself.

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Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington – October 18, 2008
There were a lot of Canada Geese out this day.

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Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington – October 18, 2008
There wasn’t a great deal of action this day at Nisqually. Like this Mallard, I had an itch to take some photos.

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Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – July 26, 2008
When I got back from my first summer Maine trip, I dropped by Theler Wetlands. There wasn’t much going on this day, but the Mallards were headed to the Mall.

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Camden, Maine – July 17, 2008
On July 17th we were on the road again. The coastal villages of Maine are some of my favorite places to visit. These Mallards were found right in town where a freshwater stream flows into the bay. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 300mm, ISO 100, 1/100 sec, f/5.6, tripod

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The Fill – Seattle Washington – June 27, 2008
This particular duck was a mystery to my birding friend, Doug Parrot, and myself on this outing – my first visit to the well-known Fill next to the University of Washington. It reminded me of the Black ducks I saw in Maine, but the bill is not yellow and feet are not orangish. It just doesn’t look like a Mallard, but maybe it is a hybrid bird. This was not the only bird of this type at this location.

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Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – May 31, 2008
This is a female of this species. It was located quite a distance from me so the photo is not very good.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom, Manfrotto tripod

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Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – May 31, 2008
It is late spring and this proud mother Mallard is taking a swim with her brood. What a happy family!
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom, Manfrotto tripod

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May 31, 2008 – Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge
I found this goose family near the trail that goes from the visitor center to McAllister Creek. There were several sets of families in the same area.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 440mm, 1/320 sec, ISO 200, Manfrotto tripod

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Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – May 16, 2008
This is the second of two sets of digiscoped photos of this species.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece

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Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – May 16, 2008
This is the first of two sets of digiscoped photos of this species. I was lucky enough to find them fairly near the trail. I really like the bright red eyes. Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece

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Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – May 16, 2008
I’m always a sucker for a duck or goose with their little ones. This is a great time of the year.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED with 30x WA eyepiece

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Moss Landing, California – March 31, 2008
As yet, I have not been able to get anywhere close to this species. These digiscoped photos were taken at the extent of my scope and camera abilities. Unfortunately, when shooting at such a distance there is no chance to get a sharp image. One day…
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

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Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – March 22, 2008
This female Mallard was found in the tall grass near the trail.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

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Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – March 16, 2008
A few Buffleheads were swimming in the flooded field to the left of the trail as you walk out to McCallister Creek. The previous photo of the Northern Shoveler was on the right side of the trail. Second photo shows male and female.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 490mm, f6.3, 1/250 sec, ISO 200, Manfrotto tripod

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Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – March 16, 2008
Here is a set of three photos taken of this male Northern Shoveler. It was in the water just off the trail to McAllister Creek.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 440mm, f6.3, 1/320 sec, ISO 200, Manfrotto tripod

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Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – March 16, 2007
The first photo is a male. The second photo is a female. There were only these two birds of this species found this day.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, f6.3, 1/160 sec, ISO 200, Manfrotto tripod

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Fir Island – Conway, Washington – February 17, 2008
This is the third and last set of Snow Geese photos. Notice the band around the bird in the third photo.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 380mm, f6.3, 1/2500 sec, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod

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Fir Island – Conway, Washington – February 17, 2008
This is the second set of photos of these beautiful geese.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 380mm, f6.3,1/2500 sec, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod

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Fir Island – Conway, Washington – February 17, 2008
I had so many opportunities to get close-up photos of these birds it was hard to narrow down what I want to share with you. I finally got things down to 3 sets of 3 or 9 photos total of birds on the ground – mostly eating grass. This is set 1.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 290mm, f10, 1/1250 sec, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod

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Fir Island, Conway, Washington – February 17, 2008
Here is the second set of flight photos showing two or more birds. Fir Island is a land laced with water, where the North and South forks of the Skagit River rush to Skagit Bay to meet in marshy fields, along riparian areas, and in tideflats that are teeming with birdlife year-round. In the spring and fall, this is a great location for observing shorebirds and songbirds in migration, and in winter it hosts thousands of Snow Geese and lesser numbers of Tundra and Trumpeter Swans.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 390mm, f13, 1/1250 sec, ISO 400, handheld

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Fir Island, Washington – February 17, 2008
I have two sets of three photos each showing multiple birds in the air. Some shots show the birds just before
landing – which was not easy because the ground was basically wall to wall geese. These birds also made quite a bit of noise while in the air. Well, they made quite a bit of noise on the ground too, but some birds had their mouth full of grass which cut down on the din.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 230mm, f6.3, 1/2500 sec, ISO 400, handheld

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Fir Island, Washington – February 17, 2008
Here is a set of photos showing some of the geese on the ground. They would feed on the grass in the field and then get spooked now and then and take flight – only to settle down again. There were several Bald Eagles sitting in the field some distance away – waiting for an opportunity.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 200mm, f13, 1/12500 sec, Manfrotto tripod

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Fir Island, Washington – February 17, 2008
This is the second set of individual flight photos.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 230mm, f6.3, 1/2500 sec, handheld

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Fir Island, Washington – February 17, 2008
This is the first set of three photos of individual flying Snow Geese. There are two sets of individual flying Snow Geese photos. Needless to say we were awed by the whole experience and took many photos.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 320mm, f9.0, 1/1250 sec, handheld

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Fir Island, Washington – February 17, 2008
A FEW flying Snow Geese we found.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 200mm, f7.1, 1/3200 sec, ISO 800, Manfrotto tripod

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Fir Island, Washington – February 17, 2008
We drove well north of Seattle and Everett to see these birds. We were not disappointed. From this location we could see the Snow Geese (photos coming up next) in another field. It was a very noisy place!
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

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Fir Island, Washington – February 17, 2008
I believe the first swan is a Tundra. Most of the swans I think were Trumpeters with a few Tundras mixed in. The Tundra is supposed to have a yellow spot on the bill near the eye. They were noisy birds. Most photos were digiscoped.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

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Location – either Port Orchard or Vaughn Bay – Washington – January 13, 2008
I found this digiscoped photo of a young male goldeneye (I think a Barrow’s) in my February Fir Island photos. It was probably taken at Port Orchard where I was photographing several Barrow’s.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, f6.5, 1/310 sec, ISO 100, Manfrotto tripod

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Port Orchard, Washington – January 13, 2008
This is the second set of two. In this set you have photo two showing a female duck and then a pair in the third photo. The male is a little blurred in photo three, but I liked the antics of this photo.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 450mm, f6.3, 1/640 sec, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod

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Port Orchard, Washington – January 13, 2008
This is set one of two sets of three photos of this species. There were several Barrows swimming around near the public boat slips today.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 450mm, f6.3, 1/500 sec, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod

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Port Orchard, Washington – January 13, 2008
This is the second set of three photos of this species. Photos two and three include a female.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, f6.3, 1/250 sec, ISO 200, Manfrotto tripod

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Port Orchard, Washington – January 13, 2008
This is the first of two sets of three of this species. The third shot in this series shows the beautiful coloring of the back of the bird. All of these photos are of male birds. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, f6.3, 1/250 sec, ISO 200, Manfrotto tripod

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Port Orchard, Washington – January 13, 2008
This is a very difficult bird to photograph. This particular photo is not very good, but I include it to show you what angles of sunlight do to the coloring of this bird’s feathers.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, f6.3, 1/640 sec, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod

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Port Orchard, Washington – January 13, 2008
This is a young male of this species. You can see around his eye how his head is beginning to turn black.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, f6.3, 1/640, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod

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Port Orchard, Washington – January 13, 2008
There are always a lot of scoters in Port Orchard. We usually see White-winged and Surf species.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500 mm, f6.3, 1/200 sec, ISO 200, Manfrotto tripod

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Port Orchard, Washington – January 13, 2008
The wife and I had a fun day down at the Port Orchard waterfront. There were plenty of birds to photograph on a gorgeous, sunny winter day.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, f6.3, 1/200 sec, ISO 100, Manfrotto tripod