Chickadees Titmice Nuthatches Bushtits Creeper Wrentit Verdin

Important Announcement

From this point forward postings will be made on the main page, but the photos will also be added to the gallery. To see the written information about the photo do a search for the number (the first number, if it is a set).

1026
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – December 21, 2011
Nikon D7000, Tamron 70-300 VC zoom at 300mm, ISO 800, f/5.6, 1/250 sec

988
Live Oak Library – Santa Cruz, California – November 10, 2011
These birds are so hard to photograph. They are constantly moving, and half the time up-side-down. The library is across the lagoon from our cottage. Along the edge of the lagoon next to the parking lot, there are often a lot of birds in the trees. I was sitting in the car while my wife ran into the library to exchange some books. A small flock of Bushtits coerced me out of the car. The photos are not great, but I tried hard!

965
Santa Cruz, California – October 22, 2011
One of the first things I did when I moved down to Santa Cruz, was to put up a bird feeder. The neighbors have two that they put a seed mixture into. They get mostly finches. I thought I would put out black oil sunflower seeds to try to draw some different birds. Well, it worked. Now we have tons of Chestnut-backed Chickadees. When we’re up in Washington we get mostly Black-capped Chickadees. We get a few Chestnuts, but it is nice to see them is large numbers. We can look out our kitchen window and see the feeder about 10 feet away. This is nice. Up in Washington are feeders are behind the house and you have to go outside to check them out. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 410mm, ISO 200, f/6.0, 1/320 sec

929
UC Santa Cruz Arboretum – Santa Cruz, California – July 27, 2011
I love these cute little birds. Unfortunately they are usually very hard to photograph because they don’t sit in one place for long. There were a handful of these birds in a shaded area near the visitor’s center. These two photos are not that good, but I wanted to remember that I saw them at the arboretum. This is the first time I’ve seen them here, and there wasn’t a whole lot of bird activity on this day. Nikon D80, Nikon 70-300 zoom at 300mm, ISO 100, f/5.6, 1/125 sec, handheld

903
Santa Cruz, California – March 28, 2011
Nikon D80, Nikon 70-300 VR lens at 300 mm, f/5.6, 1/40, ISO 200 Up in Puget Sound we only see Red-breasted Nuthatches. This is the first Pygmy Nuthatch I’ve seen, so I can add another species to my Life List.  It isn’t a great shot. The light was low, but this is the first photo I took using my son-in-law’s Nikon 70-300 VR lens. Shawn lent me his lens to see how I would do hand holding a VR lens rather than being limited to my tripod and my heavy 200-500 Tamron zoom.

869
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – August 29, 2010
As I have said before, summer is not the best birding in Western Washington. You can go to your favorite birding spot one day and see a lot of birds and then another day you can strike out. This was pretty much a strike out day for photography. We saw more birds than photographed, but it wasn’t that great a day. I took this photo of a Black-capped Chickadee even though I can do as well in my backyard. The photo is a bit soft, but this is the only bird photo of the day.

811
Carmel, Maine – December 26, 2008
Who can resist the charm of the little Black-capped Chickadee?

809
Carmel, Maine – December 24, 2008
As promised in the previous posting, here is the White-breasted Nuthatch so you can compare with the Red-breasted. The only thing I don’t like about blogs is that they are not completely photographer friendly since they post the latest posting before a previous one. This may be good for communication of ideas and chit chat, but when one has an order of progression, you have to go backwards on a blog. Each of my photos are numbered (this one is 809), so keep this in mind when viewing multiple postings that are connected in some way.

808
Carmel, Maine – December 24, 2008
During my Christmas visits to Maine I had seen a lot of White-breasted Nuthatches, but this was the first time I had seen the Red-breasted species. Here are a few photos of this bird as he fed on sunflower seeds on the back porch. The next posting will have be of a White-breasted species so you can compare.

790
Somewhere In Maine – December 18, 2008
I don’t know how this Creeper found its way into my July 2008 folder. It was probably taken during one of my Christmas trips to Maine. If you weren’t looking for this bird you would probably walk right past it. It blends in very well with the bark of the trees it climbs up and down looking for bugs. At Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State, I observed a pair of Brown Creepers going in and out of a nest. I didn’t realize there was a nest there until I saw the bird enter and exit. The tree was a large fir and the entrance to the nest looked like a ripple in the bark. I can’t recall if the birds had an entrance with a separate exit.

781
Carmel, Maine – July 2008
Just having a little fun!

780
Carmel, Maine – July 2008
I always enjoy watching nuthatches. They are so animated. Besides, we don’t have this species in Puget Sound. The bird we have is very similar, but has a red breast – Red-breasted Nuthatch. Maine is lucky to have both species. Here are a few poses. In the next posting I was having a little fun with a few White-breasted Nuthatch photos. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 380 to 400mm, first two at ISO 250 and last two at ISO 500, first two at 1/160 sec and last two at 1/125 sec, first two at f/6.0 and last two at f/8.0, tripod

756
Bird’s Acre, Ellsworth, Maine – July 11, 2008
This photo was taken for ID and record purposes. I found this Creeper on the loop trail that is behind the Bird’s Acre facility. The lighting was poor and I was shooting at 800 ASA which tends to be a bit grainy. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 450mm, 1/60 sec at ASA 800, tripod

725
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – May 16, 2008
This little creeper had a secret den in a tree right next to the parking lot. Both Ma and Pa were flying back and forth bringing nesting material for their little hide-away. If you’ve wondered what a creeper’s belly looks like, wonder no more! Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom

715
Vaughn Bay, Washington – May 14, 2008

This species is an occasional visitor to my backyard bird feeders. Their cousin the Black-capped are around all the time, but I really feel like the arrival of a Chestnut-backed Chickadee is a treat. The two species have very similar characteristics and behaviors.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom

714
Vaughn Bay, Washington – May 14, 2008
Here is another backyard regular. We have Black-capped Chickadees all year. They love it when I put the suet cakes out during the winter. How could anyone NOT like this cute little bird. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom

628
Carmel, Maine – December 25, 2007
This is the last photos I have of this bird for 2007.
Niko D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 390mm, f/6.0, 1/160 sec, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod, photos taken through the dining room window

621
Carmel, Maine – December 23, 2007
Here are two quickie photographs I took of the Maine state bird. They love their sunflower seeds.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/200 sec, f/6.3, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod – photos taken through the dining room window

614
Carmel, Maine – December 22, 2007
The Black-capped Chickadee is a favorite bird for many people. I’m no exception. I love this little bird. In fact, this little guy is Maine’s state bird.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod – photos taken through the dining room window

612
Carmel, Maine – December 22, 2007
Both the bird seed and the suet attracted this little Nuthatch. We have the Red-breasted Nuthatch in Puget Sound and I love to listen to its little beep call. They are brave little guys and go for the food even if you’re standing close to the feeder.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod – photo taken through the dining room window

600
Carmel, Maine – December 21, 2007
With 2-3 feet of snow on the ground, my son-in-law would scatter seed below the feeders and on the deck railing that he scraped off. All of this just to intice these little guys to come close to the camera, which was located in the warmth of the house. It worked!
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 250mm, 1/640 sec, f/5.6, ISO 100, Manfrotto tripod – taken through the dining room window

593
Carmel, Maine – December 20, 2007
These little guys were frequent visitors to the backyard bird feeders. We have the Red-breasted Nuthatch at our backyard feeders in Puget Sound. It was nice to see this relative.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/320 sec, ISO 400, f/6.3, Manfrotto tripod – photos taken through the dining room window

591
Carmel, Maine – December 20, 2007
Photography with 2 to 3 feet of snow and snowing can be a bit challenging. Weather never keeps the Black-capped Chickadee from being out there. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 460mm, 1/250 sec, ISO 400, f/6.3, Manfrotto tripod – photographing through the dining room window.

549
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – July 23, 2007
I don’t think I’ve ever seen a Bushtit sit in one place for longer than a split-second. It looks like we have a little family here. There is another Bushtit sitting on a branch below what you can see in the photo.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 360 mm, 1/13 sec, Manfrotto tripod

469
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – May 12, 2007
Along the trail that goes parallel to the Nisqually River you will find a loop trail that goes around a pond/marshy area. While walking on this loop I found this chickadee gathering fluff for its nest. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/100 sec, Manfrotto tripod

454
Juanita Park – Kirkland, Washington – May 6, 2007
Here is a set of 3 photos. I had to use Photoshop to bring out the color because there was so much light coming from behind the bird. Getting rid of shadows is one of Photoshops greatest abilities as far as I’m concerned.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 450mm, 1/500 sec, Manfrotto tripod

433
Vaughn Bay, Washington – April 22, 2007
Generally, bird photographers do not like to photograph birds at bird feeders. They prefer to make their shots in a natural setting. I prefer the natural setting as well, but I don’t mind the occasional feeder photo as long as the bird is clearly visible. This chickadee is looking very regal here. This species LOVES sunflower seeds. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 300 mm, 1/200 sec, Manfrotto tripd

429
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – April 15, 2007
Here is a series of four shots of this Black-capped Chickadee. He was having a grand ole time in this tree. The lighting wasn’t great, but I managed to salvage a photo or two. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 420mm, 1/250 sec, Manfrotto tripod

358
Corcoran Lagoon – Santa Cruz, California – April 2, 2007
Today was the first day of our birding trip to Santa Cruz. Our bungalow is just a few yards up from Corcoran Lagoon, so I walked down to the water while waiting for the wife to get ready to head out to Natural Bridges. I took a few shots of this bird, which is the pacific coast version of a Bushtit.

Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 300mm, 1/200 sec, handheld or Manfrotto tripod

344
Northern California Rest Stop near Redding – April 1, 2007
This is not a good photo. As you know I save shots of birds that are lifers (first time I’ve recorded a
sighting of a species), even if the photo is rather poor. At least it proves that I actually saw the
bird and allows anyone to challenge my ID of what I think I saw.

Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 390mm, 1/400 sec, Manfrotto tripod

269
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – January 14, 2007
This Black-capped Chickadee posed for me just briefly. I’ve included 3 more shots. Pick your favorite. I sort of like the one where he’s going – chicka-dee-dee-dee-dee. He was just singing his little heart out.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 300mm, 1/200 sec, Manfrotto tripod

254
Vaughn Bay, Washington – January 10, 2007
I have both the Black-capped and Chestnut-backed Chickadees in my back yard. They are not an easy bird to photograph because they don’t stay in one place for very long. They usually fly to this small tree in my neighbor’s yard before flitting over to my yard to grab sunflower seeds. I was ready for him this time!

 Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, Manfrotto tripod

051
Theler Wetlands, Belfair Washington – September 30, 2006
This Chickadee joined a Spotted Towhee and several sparrows at a rail along the trail to chow down on some seed left by a hiker. Another species, the Chestnut Backed Chickadee, looks the same except the back is reddish in color instead of brownish-gray. The Chestnuts are regular visitors at my backyard feeders.