Woodpeckers Flickers Sapsuckers

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From this point forward postings will be made on the main page, but the photos will also be added to the gallery. To see the written information about the photo do a search for the number (the first number, if it is a set).

960
Elkhorn Slough National Wildlife Refuge – California – October 14, 2011
Here are three photos of this species. Check out the holes in the dead tree. You can see the nuts the birds are storing in there. Acorn Woodpeckers are a good bet on this part of the trail. I’ve seen them on most of my Elkhorn Slough walks, but I saw more on this day than usual. The lighting was tough, so the photos are a little soft. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, ISO 200, f/6.3, 1/320 sec, tripod

810
Carmel, Maine – December 26 & 30, 2008
I sometimes can get a little confused when trying to tell the difference between a Hairy and Downy Woodpecker. However, in these photos you can easily see that the Hairy has a bill about the same length as his head is wide. The Downy has a much shorter bill (about 1/2 the length of its head). The male of this species has a bit of red on the back of its head.

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Bangor City Forest – Bangor, Maine – July 18, 2008
Here are a few photos of this species. This was a lifer sighting for me.

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Carmel, Maine – December 27, 2007
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 380mm, f6.0, 1/250 sec, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod, taken through dining room window

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Carmel, Maine – December 25, 2007
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 300mm, f 5.6, 1/500 sec, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod, photos taken through dining room window

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Carmel, Maine – December 24, 2007
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 350mm, f 6.0, 400 ISO, 1/80 sec, Manfrotto tripod, taken through the dining room window

622
Carmel, Maine – December 23, 2007
Today was really all about Evening Grosbeaks. However, I took a few photos of birds that I had already seen. You never know when you might get that GREAT photo, so the bird photographer just shoots away. I have several Evening Grosbeaks to go through now, but I think this Hairy came out pretty good – especially the coloring.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 300mm, 1/160 sec, f/5.6, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod – photos taken through the dining room window

613
Carmel, Maine – December 22, 2007
This Hairy was quite attracted to the suet cake my son-in-law put out on the back porch. Notice how long the bill is. Downy Woodpeckers look very similar, but have a shorter bill.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 230mm, 1/320 sec, f/5.3, ISO 400, Manfrotto tripod – photo taken through the dining room window

601
Carmel, Maine – December 21, 2007
This little Downy Woodpecker was a frequent visitor to the suet block while I was visiting my Maine relatives.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 360mm. f/6.0, ISO 100, Manfrotto tripod, photos taken through the dining room window

589
Carmel, Maine – December 20, 2007
This is the only woodpecker photo I got on this date. I do get some more shots later. The woodpeckers were attracted to the suet feeder. Notice the snow falling? Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 200mm, 1/80 sec, ISO 400, f/5.0, Manfrotto tripod through dining room window

581
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge-November 23, 2007
This Pileated Woodpecker was an extremely willing subject. I don’t know why, but when I saw him I removed my camera from the tripod and walked closer to the bird. I should have taken my tripod with me, but sometimes the tripod scares birds. I think I could have gotten more clear shots had I used the tripod. As you begin the boardwalk loop trail to Two Barns, moving counter-clockwise, there is a spur boardwalk trail that takes you to a riparian lookout. This is where I found this bird. Shooting in heavy forest is always a challenge for my Tamron 200-500 zoom lens, as light can be an issue. Regardless, these are probably the best Pileated photos I’ve gotten so far.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 320mm, 1/160 sec, ISO 400, f/5.6

563
Theler Wetlands – Belfair, Washington – October 21, 2007
It was a cold blustery morning on the wetlands today. This flicker flew to a fence out on the neighboring farmer’s field, so I digiscoped it. I did some experimentation with ISO in this series of photos. I changed from ISO 50 to 400, but I was not satisfied with the level of noise in the photos. My little Nikon P4 has a range from ISO 50 to 400, and I learned that shooting at 400 didn’t cut it. On my DSLR, 400 works well, but it has a lot higher threshold. This first photo was set at ISO 50.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, 1/60 sec, f4.7, ISO 50, Manfrotto tripod

551
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – July 23, 2007
In the large trees out by the two barns, a couple of Pileated Woodpeckers were flitting around making a lot of noise. The light was poor, but I tried to get a few shots regardless. Here are a couple of my feeble attempts.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 390 mm, 1/50 sec, Manfrotto tripod

424
Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge – Washington State – April 15, 2007
We had just begun our hike when this beautiful bird decided to pose for the camera. Lighting in the forest was poor, but these came out OK.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 300 mm, 1/50 sec, Manfrotto tripod

343
Northern California Rest Stop – April 1, 2007
On the way down to Santa Cruz we made frequent stops along I5 at the rest stops. Not to relieve our-
selves, but to look for birds. At this stop in Northern CA there were several Acorn Woodpeckers. Unfortunately, the lighting was a bit poor and we had to hit the road to make it to SC before dark. Since this was the first time to see this species, I saved the rather poor photos anyway.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 460mm, 1/30 sec, Manfrotto tripod

245
Carmel, Maine – December 28, 2006
The morning before we left Maine I tried to get some last minute shots. This Downy Woodpecker wanted a snack from my son-in-law’s suet feeder.
Nikon P4, Nikon Fieldscope 82mm ED, 30x WA eyepiece, Manfrotto tripod

194
Vaughn Bay, Washington – November 28, 2006
With this flicker photo I continue with my Nov 28 photos taken at my house. The difference is that these were taken with my new Nikon D80. On many occasions I take photos with both my digiscope and my DSLR camera.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 390mm, Manfrotto tripod

078
Vaughn Bay, Washington – October 14, 2006
Northern Flickers frequent the woods behind our house. They don’t come into the backyard very often, so this was a real treat.