Hummingbirds

Important Announcement

From this point forward postings will be made on the main page, but the photos will also be added to the gallery. To see the written information about the photo do a search for the number (the first number, if it is a set).

928
UC Santa Cruz Arboretum – Santa Cruz, California – July 27, 2011
Not positive on the ID of this bird, but fairly certain that it is a juvenile Annas. There are not a whole lot of hummers around during the summer, but in the spring this place is a hummingbird paradise. Nikon D80, Nikon 70-300 zoom at 300mm, ISO 100, f/5.6, 1/160 sec, handheld

910
UC Santa Cruz Arboretum – Santa Cruz, California – March 29, 2011
When I visit the arboretum I usually see 2-3 different species of hummingbird. This is the Rufous, and one of the easier to identify because of its reddish head and body color. Nikon D80, Nikon 70-300 zoom at 300mm, f/5.6, 1/800, ISO 200
Second photo:  300mm, f/5.6, 1/100, ISO 200 You need a faster shutter speed to capture the action of a flying bird. Notice the bird is a bit blurry.

909
UC Santa Cruz Arboretum – Santa Cruz, California – March 29, 2011
One of my favorite places to visit when I’m down in Santa Cruz is the University of California Arboretum. Every spring I see lots of hummingbirds in this garden. I’m not really good at identifying hummingbirds, but I’m pretty sure these three photos are Anna’s. Thanks to Shawn for letting me use is stabilizing lens so I don’t have to use a tripod. Nikon D80, Nikon 70-300 zoom at 300mm, f/5.6, 1/320, ISO 200 handheld

823
UC Santa Cruz Arboretum – Santa Cruz, California – March 31, 2009
These are my last two hummingbird photos for the day. I don’t know for sure, but I’m guessing this is a Rufous. I could be wrong on one or both of the photos. Again, please correct me if I’m wrong.

822
UC Santa Cruz Arboretum – Santa Cruz, California – March 31, 2009
I’m going to stick my neck out and say this is an Anna’s. Please correct me if I’m wrong.

821
UC Santa Cruz Arboretum – Santa Cruz, California – March 31, 2009
As I’ve said in previous postings about the UCSC Arboretum, it is famous for its hummingbirds. Unfortunately, I’m not famous for my ID skills when it comes to hummers. I believe this to be a female Anna’s, but I could be wrong. Please feel free to correct me if I’ve made a wrong call.
Here are six photos of this bird feeding on this flower. The arboretum has an abundance of plants from all over the world. This particular plant was of great interest to this bird.

779
Carmel, Maine – July 2008
This hummingbird was a frequent visitor to Shawn and Malia’s back porch while I was visiting in Maine during my first summer trip. This is the only species of hummingbird that breeds east of the Mississippi, and if you see a hummer in Maine, Shawn says it is almost assuredly a Ruby-Throated. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 330mm, ISO 500, 1/125 sec, f8.0, tripod

751
Carmel, Maine – July 10, 2008
This Ruby-throated Hummingbird frequented the feeder on Malia’s back deck. I sat in a chair waiting for a photo opportunity, but it was no easy task to try to stop the action of this active little bird. Nikon D80, 70-200mm zoom, ISO 400, f5.0 at 1/200 sec.

709
UC Santa Cruz Arboretum – California – April 3, 2008

This was a lifer sighting for me. Evidently, this species is quite common here except for maybe 3 months of winter. Watching the hummingbirds fly straight up into the air and then dive bomb was a lot of fun. One of the photos shows a bird with its long tongue sticking straight out. This long tongue is very handy for getting nectar from flowers. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom

708
UC Santa Cruz Arboretum – California – April 3, 2008
Here is the second set of feeding Annas. See set 707 for more info.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom

707
UC Santa Cruz Arboretum – California – April 3, 2008
The Arboretum at the University of California Santa Cruz is a magnet for hummingbirds. You can see this species in the gardens all year long. I took a lot of photos. Here is a set of three. Set 708 has three more. My wife and I found some chairs and sat next to these bushes with my tripod. It is still not an easy task to get good photos of these flitty little guys. Your best chance is when they are gathering nectar.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom

518
Santa Cruz, California – July 11, 2007
This Anna’s Hummingbird was flitting around down by the lagoon. It perched in a bush for a moment and I took the opportunity to take a couple photos. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 500mm, 1/60 sec, Manfrotto tripod

511
Vaughn Bay, Washington – June 16, 2007
This is the second set of four photos. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 330 mm, 1/200 sec, Manfrotto tripod

510
Vaughn Bay, Washington – June 16, 2007
Rufous and Anna Hummingbirds have moved into the neighborhood. I stationed a chair near the feeder in hopes of getting a few photos. I have a set of 4 photos here and one more set of 4 after this. Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 350 mm, 1/50 sec, Manfrotto tripod

257
Vaughn Bay, Washington – January 10, 2007
This is one of two Anna’s that over-wintered in our neighborhood. The background of this photo is distracting, but with hummers, beggers can’t be choosers. They occasionally perch, but you never know for how long and where.
Nikon D80, Tamron 200-500 zoom at 380mm, 1/60 sec, Manfrotto tripod

252
Vaughn Bay, Washington – January 12, 2007
Here is the little hummer in flight. I took these pictures just before dark, so it’s amazing they came out at all. The second photo shows the back of the bird. Nikon D80, Nikon 55-200 zoom at 185mm, handheld

251
Vaughn Bay, Washington – January 12, 2007
There are two little hummers that have over-wintered here. This is one of them. The second photo is a little better view of the coloring on this bird’s neck. Nikon D80, Nikon 55-200 zoom at 185mm, handheld